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Fury suspension ‘blessing in disguise’, says trainer

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‘Fury will return from manic depression’

Tyson Fury’s suspension from boxing could be a “blessing in disguise”, his uncle and trainer Peter Fury says.

Fury, 28, had his licence to fight temporarily revoked the day after he gave up his world heavyweight titles to focus on mental health problems.

Peter Fury said his nephew is being treated for “a form of manic depression”.

“He now acknowledges that there is an issue. That’s the start to recovery,” Peter Fury told BBC Sport.

“But maybe it is a blessing in disguise he is taking some time out and getting this treatment, as it has been lingering on for quite a while.”

On Wednesday, Fury vacated his WBO and WBA world heavyweight titles. The British Boxing Board of Control then announced his licence had been suspended.

But Peter Fury believes the former champion will be back in the ring by April and suggested he could become a role model for young people suffering with depression.

“It just shows people it can affect you no matter what you are,” he added. “If depression can affect the linear heavyweight champion of the world, it’s a serious problem.

“How many young people do you hear about who have committed suicide down to depression? Depression is an illness.”

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Tyson Fury’s turbulent 12 months

Ban could be ‘catalyst’ to recovery

Former world heavyweight champion David Haye said Fury’s suspension could be the “catalyst” for him to re-invent himself and come back stronger.

“It’s just the beginning of [Fury’s] story, not the end,” he said.

“I’m hoping he uses this to regenerate himself. [He can be] way better than he’s ever been. He’ll be back, right as rain, and stronger mentally for it.

“This might not be the end, this might be the start, the catalyst that turns his career around. He can re-invent himself.”

Haye, 36, admitted he too had overcome bouts of depression earlier in his career.

“It’s not self-inflicted, it just happens,” Haye said. “I had it in small quantities and there was nothing wrong with me.

“Physically I was in fantastic shape. I was undefeated, but found myself locked in my room for days at a time in the dark, not talking to anyone, turning my phone off.

“I don’t know what caused it. For whatever reason I just laid in bed, under the covers, in the dark, shut the curtains, and stayed there for days.”

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/boxing/37649135