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England fight back against Bangladesh after Tamim century

Moeen Ali leads England off the field

Moeen Ali took his second five-wicket Test haul to bring England back into the match

England took nine wickets for just 49 runs to bowl out Bangladesh for 220 on day one of a fluctuating second Test.

Bangladesh lost Imrul Kayes in the third over, before Tamim Iqbal made his third century against England and put on 170 with Mominul Haque (66).

But Moeen Ali took 5-57 and Ben Stokes an influential 2-13 as the hosts lost their final nine wickets in 22 overs.

England, 1-0 up in the two-Test series, lost three quick wickets to spin and were 50-3 when rain ended play early.

Bangladesh got within 23 runs of their 286 target in the magnificent first Test in Chittagong, but their afternoon batting display equals the second-worst collapse by a team who had already scored in excess of 170 for the loss of only one wicket.

Tamim the tormentor

Having taken 20 balls to get off the mark, the normally aggressive Tamim needed only 40 more to reach fifty, before bringing up three figures in 139 deliveries for his eighth Test century.

The 27-year-old left-hander was quick to seize upon anything short and carved some loose deliveries from Chris Woakes to hit three boundaries in an over.

His footwork was also extremely nimble and he advanced down the wicket to strike two more fours in the next, the first in Test cricket by debutant slow left-armer Zafar Ansari.

Such was England’s desperation to dismiss him they wasted an lbw review with a Moeen delivery that appeared to be clearly bouncing over.

When the umpire’s finger was finally raised, to a leg-side catch behind that even bowler Stokes was unimpressed with, the opener’s immediate review showed the ball had brushed his shirt.

Having played such a variety of attacking shots it was a surprise when he padded up to Moeen – a dismissal which precipitated Bangladesh’s collapse.

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Tamim has scored 696 runs in 11 Test innings against England at an average of 63 (3 x100s, 5 x50s)

Stokes and Moeen inspire England fightback

The bowlers had appeared bereft of ideas when Tamim and Mominul were in full flow during Bangladesh’s highest second-wicket partnership against England.

Spin was once again unable to control the batsmen, and in 14 overs in the morning session, the three slow bowlers could not produce a maiden, conceding eight boundaries in the process.

Ansari’s first six overs cost 36 and contained four full tosses, prompting some unkind comparisons with Lancashire’s Simon Kerrigan, who conceded 28 in the first two overs of his debut in the 2013 Ashes series.

But as at Chittagong, Stokes inspired a resurgence with a spell of 2-7 in six overs.

He bowled with accuracy, caused doubt in the minds of the batsmen with movement outside the off-stump and struck Mushfiqur with a hostile bouncer that clearly unsettled the skipper.

Just one ball after that incident, a still shaken Mushfiqur tickled a tame catch to Alastair Cook at leg slip.

Moeen had bowled six modest overs for 23 without a hint of success before lunch, but with Stokes tying up the batsmen from the other end, the off-spinner produced a spell of 4-20 in 10 overs.

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Former England all-rounder Tim Bresnan praised Ben Stokes on Twitter

More top order troubles

England lost their first three wickets for less than 30 in both innings of a Test for the first time against an Asian team in the last match, and yielded scarcely more this time.

The hosts, having selected only one seamer, opened with spin from both ends in the form of 18-year off-spinner Mehedi, who took seven wickets on his debut in Chittagong, and slow left-armer Shakib Al Hasan.

Ben Duckett took an aggressive approach to his third Test innings, launching Shakib over long-on for six in the second over, but was caught down the leg-side three balls later.

Captain Alastair Cook became Mehedi’s second wicket, having originally been given not out.

Bangladesh’s review confirmed the ball hit him in line on the back foot and umpire Kumar Dharmasena had to overturn his third decision of the day.

Gary Ballance departed to his third successive single figure score, bringing Moeen back out to the middle to join the reliable Joe Root.

On a pitch offering plenty of assistance to the bowlers, England are once again left to rely on their all-rounders in the middle order.

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The premature end to play means that day two will start 27 minutes early at 04:33 BST

‘Stokes becoming one of the best in the world’

England all-rounder Moeen Ali, who took 5-57, told BBC Sport: “Stokesy bowled fantastically well. I think with the reversing ball he’s becoming one of the best all-rounders in the world. He was bowling tight, I was bowling tight.

“For me, I was just trying to bowl maidens to stay on. I feel like I’m an attacking bowler anyway, but I said to Cooky, ‘if I bowl a maiden, keep me on’. If the wickets come, they come, but I always feel I bowl my best if I bowl maidens.

“Zafar was a bit nervous, bowling against somebody who was set, but hopefully in the second innings he can get into his rhythm and take wickets.

“We always feel against Bangladesh that if you get them three or more down you’ve always got a chance to roll them.

“It is going to be difficult but if we can get close to them and go past them, the pressure will be right on them. They can’t afford to have another collapse, but we are going to have to bat well in both innings.”

Stats of the day

  • Alastair Cook is captaining England for the 54th time in a Test, equalling Michael Atherton’s record
  • Tamim Iqbal averages 63.27 against England, the sixth highest for any player to have scored more than 500 runs against them
  • Moeen Ali’s five-wicket haul was his second in Tests, and first overseas (having taken 6-67 against India at Southampton in 2014)

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cricket/37796156